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CPAP Masks | CPAP Full Face Masks - CPAP Nasal Masks

CPAP masks, used in conjunction with a CPAP machine, are devices that are used by individuals to treat sleep apnea. There are three main styles of CPAP masks:

  • Full Face CPAP Masks.
  • Nasal CPAP Masks.
  • Nasal Pillow CPAP Masks.

Many individuals find CPAP therapy to be a great alternative to surgery. Generally speaking, CPAP masks affix to and individual's face through headgear, integrative straps that attach to the mask. To determine which CPAP mask is right for you, make sure to peruse CPAP mask details at the bottom of this page.

We distribute only the very CPAP masks from renowned manufacturers that you love and trust, Respironics, ResMed, DeVilbiss, and Fisher & Paykel.

CPAP Mask Information: CPAP Mask Tips to Successfully Acclimate

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CPAP Mask Details

Full Face CPAP Masks are the most commonly prescribed mask, as it allows individuals to breathe through their nose or mouth. This type of mask, additionally, is a great solution for individuals that have a difficult time tolerating CPAP pressure, as it feels less compared to that of a nasal mask or nasal pillow mask. A full face mask, generally speaking, is going to be the most stable type and is the perfect alternative when individuals experience nasal congestion.

Nasal CPAP Masks are the most commonly worn mask, as they feature a wide array of styles, fits, and features. Nasal breathers prefer this type of mask over a full face mask because it does not obstruct the vision as much, as they aren't as wide and feature a smaller profile. With this type of mask, you can only breathe in and out of your nose. If you start to mouth breathe, you will inevitably lose therapeutic pressure, therefore making CPAP therapy ineffective. However, if you prefer nasal CPAP masks but breathe through your mouth, you can couple this mask with a chin strap.

Nasal Pillow CPAP Masks are, by far, the least invasive masks available on the market. These masks gently rest inside of an individual's nostrils. Though nasal pillow CPAP masks are the smallest, you may feel like you are receiving more pressure, as there is less room for the air to circulate before entering your airway. Some individuals do not notice the different sensation or find it tolerable. Many patients prefer this mask because it virtually provides a clear field of vision and has minimal parts. With this mask, similar to the nasal CPAP mask, you can only breathe in and out of your nose only. If you start to mouth breathe, you will lose therapeutic pressure, making CPAP ineffective. However, if you prefer nasal pillow CPAP masks but breathe orally, you can complement this mask with a chin strap.

Tips to Acclimate to CPAP Masks

  1. Some people may experience claustrophobia while wearing a CPAP mask. If you experience this, hold your CPAP mask to your face without headgear and pressure. This will help you get comfortable with your CPAP mask.
  2. Practice applying and removing your CPAP Mask while looking into a mirror. Always use your headgear connections to apply and remove your CPAP mask. By stretching the headgear over your head, you will shorten the lifespan of your headgear.
  3. If you are using a nasal CPAP mask or nasal pillow CPAP mask and you wake up with a dry mouth, you may be breathing through your mouth while you are asleep. It may prove beneficial to use your CPAP mask with a chin strap or switch to a full face CPAP mask.
  4. Your CPAP mask should be snug, but should never cause pain or discomfort. If your CPAP mask is causing you pain or discomfort, try loosening your headgear.
  5. CPAP masks should never leak into your eyes, around your cheeks, chin or upper lip. If you can hear or feel a pressure leak, try slightly tightening the headgear on your CPAP mask. Your CPAP mask should never hurt or cause discomfort. If you experience pain or discomfort, the mask you are currently using may not be well-suited for you.
  6. CPAP masks will hug contours on everyone differently. It may take some experimenting to find the perfect mask for you. Patience is key when it comes to successfully acclimating to your new CPAP mask.