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Incontinence Product Guide

Date: January 15, 2020
By Burt Cancaster

 

Incontinence - A Growing Concern

As baby boomers age, more and more people add to total numbers of incontinent patients. Physicians agree that the "... first treatment choice should be the least invasive option with the lowest risk for adverse complications."1 For many individuals this means the use of absorbent supplies to contain bladder leaks.

URINARY incontinence in the elderly is prevalent, morbid, costly, and neglected. It affects 5 to 15 per cent of elderly people living in the community, and its prevalence increases to approximately 40 per cent in hospitalized patients.2

Incontinent patients fight a constant battle to maintain their skin health and to remain comfortable both day and night.

Prolonged exposure to urine and feces, moisture, and friction combine to macerate, brade, and blister the skin over the buttocks and sacrum. Prolonged perineal exposure to wetness and increased temperature can result in the growth of microorganisms such as Candida albicans, resulting in candidiasis or yeast dermatitis. All of these factors work in concert to cause skin irritation, breakdown, and further skin problems. Friction can cause skin abrasion. Wet skin is more easily abraded by movement of skin against an object such as cloth and plastic in leg gathers and tape fasteners on adult briefs. Tape cuts are commonly seen in obese, elderly patients who are wearing a tightfitting adult brief. 3

The development of many absorbent supplies to assist these patients include both disposable and washable versions. It is important to "select the appropriate absorbent product, preferably one that minimizes the possibility of dermatitis. It has been shown that products designed to absorb moisture and present a quick-drying surface to the skin keep the skin drier and are associated with a significantly lower incidence of skin rashes than cloth products."4

What are the types of incontinence products?

There are many different types of urinary goods for women and men. The design of these absorbent goods rests upon four basic factors. First, active lifestyles and discreetness, second, the amount of absorbency required, third, the need for extended wear times, and forth, the level of caregiver assistance needed for application. Heavier leaks require more robust protection, while more active lifestyles require a more discreet and flexible commodity. Incontinent patients with mobility impairments that need caregiver assistance to don or remove a bladder control items require that it can be applied while the patient is lying down or sitting. Enuresis offerings include liners, pads, shields, guards, protective underwear, briefs, and underpads. A more detailed description of each item is below.

 

Bed Pads

TENA Bed Pad

Beds pads (also known as underpads, hospital bed pads, disposable bed pads, reusable bed pads or washable underpads) protect mattresses from urine and fecal enuresis. They are available in various sizes, with 23 x 36 inches being the most popular. These soft, thin sheets are absorbent and lie flat on top of the mattress’s fitted sheet. There are two separate types of underpads—disposable and reusable. The disposable bed pads are much more popular than the washable versions. After use, you may discard disposable bed pads, and you may launder and reapply washable underpads.

Often taking on the name of underpads, these protective pads are in wide use to protect more than just mattresses. They also protect chairs and other furniture, they absorb waste from pets, wrap shipping items, protect items from plumping leaks, and aid with protection from spills in arts and crafts projects.

 

 

Typical Bed Pad Features

Bed Pad Anatomy

 

Advantages of Bed Pads

  • Available in disposable and washable versions
  • Protects mattresses, furniture, flooring, etc.
  • Prevents stains
  • Many sizes to select from
  • Many other uses
  • Disposable or washable versions available

Disadvantages of Underpads

  • Environmental impact, landfill issues
  • Expensive

 

 

Protective Underwear

ATN Protective Underwear

 

These pull on and off devices (also known as pull-ups, disposable underwear, or absorbent underwear) offer various levels of absorbency and closely mimic real underwear. Generally, the higher the absorbency, the bulkier the item. Many different versions exist that offer breathability, cloth-like feel, discreetness, odor control, body contouring, and day or night use. The design of this offering supports active adults.

 

Typical Protective Underwear Features

Protective Underwear Anatomy

 

Advantages of Protective Underwear

  • an adaptation that most closely resembles regular underwear
  • Soft feeling
  • Many cloth-like versions
  • Many offer odor control
  • Full night versions available
  • Many absorbency levels, including options that can absorb over 40 ounces
  • Available in washable and disposable versions
  • Close and comfortable fit
  • Some models eliminate rustling and noise

Disadvantages of Protective Underwear

  • Bulkier than some other options
  • Less discreet
  • More difficult to don and doff
  • Many are not breathable
  • Vulnerable to overheating
  • Models with plastic outer layers can be noisy
  • Expensive
  • Landfill issues

 

 

Briefs

ATN Brief

 

 

Briefs come with tape or hook-and-loop style tabs that offer closure around the hips and legs of your body. Designed similar to a diaper, briefs offer bladder protection to disabled or bed-ridden individuals. This type of absorbent wear allows caregivers to more easily change soiled briefs while the patient is lying down.

 

Typical Incontinence Brief Features

Incontinence Briefs Anatomy

 

Advantages of Adult Briefs

  • Disposable or washable versions available
  • Designed for caregiver ease of use
  • Select between tape and hook-and-loop versions
  • Highly absorbent
  • Supports mobility patients
  • Some models support overnight use
  • Odor control versions available

Disadvantages of Briefs

  • Larger a bulkier than other options
  • Many are not breathable
  • Taped closure versions can stick to your skin
  • Vulnerable to overheating
  • Expensive
  • Landfill issues

 

 

Bladder Control Pads

Prevail Pad

Designed for light urinary protection, these pads offer women convenience for an active lifestyle. The pads are easy to replace when soiled and simple to dispose. They may be carried with you and replaced in any restroom. They offer discreet protection and are the least intrusive. Designed for women, Bladder Control Pads offer flexibility and ease of use.

 

Typical Bladder Control Pad Features

Bladder Control Pad Anatomy

 

Advantages of Enuresis Pads

  • More discreet
  • Smaller size
  • Lower cost
  • Supports active lifestyle
  • Lower environmental impact than briefs or protective underwear
  • Disposable

Disadvantages

  • Low absorbency
  • Easier to develop leaks

 

 

Male Guards

Tena Guards

 

 

Male Guards are Bladder Control Pads for men. Guards have a tapered design on one end to better accommodate the male anatomy. An adhesive strip secures against and undergarment to keep the guard in place. Some guards have a foam layer for additional absorption. Offering light protection, Male Guards are discreet, inexpensive, and easy to use.

 

Typical Incontinence Guards Features

Incontinence Guards Anatomy

 

Advantages of Male Guards

  • Smaller size
  • More discreet
  • Lower cost
  • Lower environmental impact than briefs or protective underwear
  • Disposable

Disadvantages

  • Less absorbency
  • Easier to develop leaks than protective underwear

 

 

Male Shields

Depends Shields

 

 

This device offers light to moderate protection for men. The design of the shield is for use in conjunction with tight-fitting brief style underwear or stretch mesh briefs. These shields work for light to moderate urinary leaks.

 

Typical Shield Features

Shields Anatomy

 

Advantages of Male Shields

  • More comfortable
  • More discreet
  • More discreet
  • Smaller size
  • Slightly thinner than guards
  • Light absorption
  • Lower cost
  • Disposable

Disadvantages

  • Low absorbency
  • Easier to develop leaks

 

 

Liners

TENA Liner

 

 

Designed for women, liners offer light bladder leakage protection. They are thin and less intrusive than other urinary protection garments. Liners are discreet. They have a waterproof backing to keep absorbed contents from leaking.

 

Typical Liner Features

Liner Anatomy

 

Advantages of Enuresis Liners

  • More discreet
  • Smaller size
  • Lower cost
  • Disposable

Disadvantages

  • Low absorbency
  • Easier to develop leaks

 

 

Booster Pads

Booster Pads

 

This item supplements an existing absorbent good such as briefs, protective underwear, or bladder control pads. It adds a layer of absorbency. Its design does not incorporate a moisture barrier and, therefore, should not be used independently.

 

Typical Booster Pad Features

Booster Pad Anatomy

 

Advantages of Booster Pads

  • More discreet
  • Smaller size
  • Lower cost
  • Disposable

Disadvantages

  • Low absorbency
  • Easier to develop leaks

 

 

How to Select the Best Incontinence Product

Selection factors include the levels of patient activity, absorbency, leak protection, discreetness, application requirements, and wear time. These selection factors are somewhat in opposition to each other. For instance, the more absorbency developed into the brand by enhancing the absorbent core, the better the leak protection, the longer the wear time, but the less discreetness and decreased patient activity. Conversely, the more discreetness and activity accommodations made into the brand, the less absorbency and wear time. Finding the right balance that best meets the individual patient’s needs is important to obtain the best possible option. What is best for one person is not necessarily best for another.

 

Incontinence Products Continuum

Incontinence Product Selection Continuum

 

As displayed in the continuum above, the best absorption option is the one that best meets the patient’s needs or, in some cases, the caregiver’s needs. Active patients have a greater need for discreetness and freedom of movement. Most often, their leak containment requirements are less than heavy bladder control patients. Active patients prefer less bulky options that allow more freedom of movement and are more discreet—not easily detected by other people. The more flexible and discreet options display on the left side of the continuum. The items on the left offer light to moderate absorbency. The items on the right of the continuum offer heavy to super absorbency. Patients who are less active and have less control of bladder leaks require more aggressive options that can absorb greater volumes. They may also need their bladder control goods to provide extended wear times—throughout the day or the night. These items display towards the right of the continuum.

For severe leakage problems, patients may need to double the protection measures. Double protection or product stacking occurs by using urine collection in layers. For instance, adding a booster pad to a brief for additional absorption or adding an underpad beneath a reclining patient wearing a brief or adult diaper. Items that stack with other urinary protection supplies display on the far right of the continuum.

Note that on the left side of the continuum, the objective of the enuresis options is to protect clothing from urinary leaks. As you move towards the right, the benefits expand to include protection for bed mattresses and furniture.

Modern absorbency brands not only protect clothing and furniture, but they also seek to protect your skin. New technologies allow bladder management supplies to wick moisture away from your skin and lock the moisture in a core containment layer. Breathable material allows air to circulate to keep you dry and comfortable longer.

Urine Protection for Plus Sizes

These urinary protection options come in sizes to accommodate larger sized individuals. Also known as bariatric sizes, there are X-Large, 2X-Large, 3X-Large, and 4X-Large sizes. The largest size equates to a 106-inch waist size by Tranquility Air Plus. The design of these items maximizes absorption and leak protection.

Odor Control

A good odor control solution contains an odor-reducing additive and excellent containment. Manufacturing of these remedies takes place with styrene-butadiene and butyl acrylate materials woven into a cellulose or polymer fiber for an absorbent core. "[M]ore advanced products, may also make use of one or more acquisition or transport layers that help to quickly and effectively carry fluid into the absorbent core, while maintaining dryness against the skin. These acquisition layers are typically formed from synthetic staple fibres thermally bonded in a nonwoven structure, or a structure made up of chemically or mechanically modified cellulose fibres. The absorbent structures are embedded between a layer near the skin usually called a topsheet, which is made of polymer or natural fibres, and a backsheet of polyethylene film or a film/nonwoven composite ('textile backsheet'). The backsheet can be made of a microporous material to allow for vapour permeability or 'breathability'. Most importantly, the breathable backsheet reduces the relative humidity on the surface of skin in the diaper by allowing water vapour to pass outward."5

These dispsable absorbents do not contain perfume which will make the odor worse. Instead, they contain chemical neutralizers, zeolites, and other additives that significantly help to reduce odor even after disposal.

Urinary Supplies Delivered to Your Home

The convenience of absorbent solutions delivered directly to your home instead of shopping for them locally is a growing trend. This purchasing method is more discreet and often available with free shipping when bundled with an Automatic Reoccurring Order. These specialized delivery services are a personalized delivery plan allowing you to select what supplies ship and when. When circumstances change, the customer can easily modify the delivery plan to meet changing needs.

Reusable Vs. Disposable

Reusable absorbent solutions use washable fabric as its primary construction material. They are more discreet than disposable options. Since these items wash after use, it is practically an endless supply. You do not have to worry about running out before your next purchase. Some argue that there is less of an environmental impact with reusable products than disposable because of the problem with crowded landfills. Many incontinent patients find washable versions more comfortable.

Perhaps the biggest incentive for using disposable devices is convenience. It is much easier to dispose of a dirty diaper than to wash one. This convenience for most outweighs the additional cost associated with disposable alternatives. People are will to pay more for the benefit of not having to deal with a dirty diaper other than to throw it away.

Buying Enuresis Supplies?

Not only is bladder leakage a common issue, but it can be expensive. The cost depends on the brand and size of the package.

Seniors can expect to spend $50 to $250 per month for adult diapers. Most seniors live on a fixed income, and this monthly expense can drain their wallets. There are a few ways you can get help with costs or at least reduce them.

Medical expense receipts can be a deduction on tax returns if you meet certain requirements.6

The Internet makes it easy to buy supplies online from popular retailers. They even deliver to your door, an option for seniors unable to get to and from the store.

Buying in bulk saves in cost because most companies offer discounts with large amounts. Many online retailers offer coupon discounts and free shipping.

Many manufacturers offer a free trial to try out their solutions. Below are some links to FREE Samples of enuresis remedies.

FREE Incontinence Products

 

FAQ’s

What are the top bladder control supplies?
What are enuresis supplies made of?
What is the best urinary solution?
What is the most absorbent incontinent choice?
How often should bladder control supplies be changed?
Will Medicare pay for incontinence products?
What are the best overnight enuresis options?
What is the best solution for male enuresis?
What are the top bladder control pads?
What are the top brands for enuresis remedies?
What are the absorbent levels of enuresis supplies?
Are there bladder control devices for dogs or pets?
What are the enuresis options for swimming?
What is the difference between briefs and reusable underwear?
What are the advantages and disadvantages of reusable underwear?
What should I look for in a brief or disposable pad?
What should I look for in a pad or shield?

 

What are the top incontinence supplies?

Bladder control pads, adult briefs, protective underwear, and bed pads are the top-selling urinary supplies.

 

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What are enuresis goods made of?

A blend of materials combines to construct layers for disposable adult enuresis solutions. These materials include cotton, polyester, and nylon. The most inner layer acts to wick away moisture from your skin to an absorbent core and then quickly dries to keep your skin dry. The core locks moisture away from your skin. The outer layer is made with a blend of breathable materials to all air to circulate but does not allow moisture to escape from the core. Many remedies also incorporate elastic around the legs to prevent leaks and closure tabs or adhesive strips to keep the solution in place.

Absorbent products in today's market are made up of a range of materials and component parts, which are adapted and optimised for the specific application in the different products. There are, however, some common elements across all products. All contain an absorbent core, which may be made up of cellulose or polymer fibres, superabsorbent polymer, or mixtures of fluff and superabsorbent polymers. Modern products, particularly more advanced products, may also make use of one or more acquisition or transport layers that help to quickly and effectively carry fluid into the absorbent core, while maintaining dryness against the skin. These acquisition layers are typically formed from synthetic staple fibres thermally bonded in a nonwoven structure, or a structure made up of chemically or mechanically modified cellulose fibres. The absorbent structures are embedded between a layer near the skin usually called a topsheet, which is made of polymer or natural fibres, and a backsheet of polyethylene film or a film/nonwoven composite ('textile backsheet'). The backsheet can be made of a microporous material to allow for vapour permeability or 'breathability'. Most importantly, the breathable backsheet reduces the relative humidity on the surface of skin in the diaper by allowing water vapour to pass outward.7

 

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What is the best absorbent solution?

The best bladder control choice is not necessarily the best for everybody. What matters most is what is best for your specific needs. Pads and liners are great for people with light leaks and who are active. Protective underwear is great for those who have moderate to heavy leaks. Briefs are best for people who need to be changed while they are sitting or reclining. Underpads can serve multiple purposes but are most often used to protect furniture and mattresses. Numerous studies find that "absorbent briefs [which are more expensive] are more cost-effective over incontinence pads..." 8 Another study found that preference for pullups (protective underwear) over inserts for daytime use resulted from people experiencing leaks with disposable inserts. This study found the following observations:

Pull-ups (the most expensive) were better overall than the other designs for women during the day and for community-dwelling [nursing homes or elder care facilities] women during the night. Although disposable diapers were better for leakage than disposable inserts (the cheapest), women did not prefer them (except in nursing homes at night), but for men the diapers were better both overall and for leakage and were the most cost-effective design. 9

The best course of action is to sample several options during different parts of the day and night to determine the best product mix for each patient. Over time, the best solutions may diminish with changing circumstances; therefore, justifying an adjustment to the product selection. Higher leak volumes will push patients towards the remedies on the right of the selection continuum. Lower leak volumes tend to keep patients in the less restrictive selections to the left of the continuum. For some women with light leaks, the preference is towards menstrual pads or washable absorbent pants.10

 

Typical Absorbency Levels for Enuresis Supplies

Typical Incontinence Products Absorption Levels

 

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What are the most absorbent bladder control supplies?

Overnight protection is the most absorbent commodity. They often carry the name of "Super," "Maximum," "Maxi," or "Extra." Although many manufacturers fail to publish their actual absorbency capacity in ounces, a few of them do. Below is a list of top absorbent bladder control items along with their absorbent capacity.

 

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How often should enuresis devices be changed?

When is the best time to change your absorption device? When it gets wet! Since many are not able to change on the fly, below is a helpful table for the maximum wear time.

  • Liners – 3 to 4 hours
  • Pads – 4 to 6 hours
  • Guards – 4 to 6 hours
  • Protective Underwear – 4 to 8 hours
  • Briefs – 4 to 8 hours
  • Underpads – 8 hours

 

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Will Medicare pay for absorption goods?

"Medicare doesn't cover incontinence pads or adult diapers.... You pay 100% for incontinence pads and adult diapers."11

[T]he Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) will reimburse suppliers that provide incontinence supplies to aid individuals whose incontinence condition ... is of long and indefinite duration." Such reimbursement is provided only as part of Medicare’s coverage for prosthetic devices such as catheters and external urinary collection devices."12

According to Medicare Carriers Manual section 2130, ‘prosthetic devices (other than dental) which replace all or part of an internal body organ (including contiguous tissue), or replace all or part of the function of a permanently inoperative or malfunctioning internal body organ are covered when furnished on a physician’s order.' Under the Medicare Part B program, the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) will reimburse suppliers that provide incontinence supplies to aid individuals whose incontinence condition '...is of long and indefinite duration.' Certain items, such as absorbent undergarments or diapers, are specifically excluded from coverage.13

Does Medicare Cover Enuresis Supplies?

For the most part, Medicare won’t cover the cost of adult diapers or incontinence pads. These items will be your responsibility, 100%.

Although, there may be an advantage plan that covers adult diapers through an over the counter benefit.

Types of incontinence include stress, overactive bladder, urge, or a mixture. Part B pays 80% of the allowable costs for office visits to treat bladder issues.

However, the remaining 20% balance is the patient’s burden. If you have extra coverage, the charge won’t be on you.

Common Complaints stem from not understanding benefits and coverage. Using an agent can help by answering questions and clarifying what the plan covers.

Medicare Coverage for Incontinence Supplies

At-home catheters may be necessary for some seniors. Those with home health care may get coverage for pads as part of benefits.

Sadly, even if it’s essential – Medicare doesn’t pay for supplies like pads or adult diapers. The program pays for catheters; but, it doesn’t cover the costs of disposables.

Some insurance plans may pay for supplies, although benefits vary by program.

Does Medicare Pay for Adult Diapers?

Medicare will not pay for adult diapers because they are disposables for at-home use, just like gauze and band-aids.

In a few cases, Medicare covers disposable underwear – but not often. This coverage would take place by home delivery of disposable supplies by a supplier of Medicaid approved solutions.

Some items sent by mail or shipping right to your front door may be reimbursable by Medicaid. You should work directly through your doctor for reimbursement. This process varies by state.

Will Medicare Pay for Depends?

Depends is a popular brand name of adult diapers. If you require a special brand of disposable absorbent supplies, it is unlikely you will have coverage.

Since insurance does not cover disposable supplies, it is your responsibility; no matter which brands you choose.

While Medicare will not help you pay for Depends, some state Medicaid programs help cover the cost....

Buying Incontinence Supplies?

Not only is [enuresis] a common issue, but it can be expensive. The cost depends on the brand and size of the package.

Seniors can expect to spend $50 to $250 per month for adult diapers. Most seniors live on a fixed income, and this monthly expense can drain their wallets. There are a few ways you can get help with costs or at least reduce them.

Medical expense receipts can be a deduction on tax returns if you meet certain requirements.14

The Internet makes it easy to buy supplies online from popular retailers. They even deliver to your door, an option for seniors unable to get to and from the store.

Buying in bulk saves in cost because most companies offer discounts with large amounts. Many online retailers offer coupon discounts and free shipping.15

Many manufacturers offer a free trial to try out their brands. Below are some links to FREE Samples of incontinent commodities.

FREE Incontinence Products

 

Back to FAQ Menu

 

What are the best overnight urinary absorption devices?

There are an abundance of bladder management solutions for night use. They come with high absorption capacity, breathability, leak guards, elastic waistbands, rapid absorption with a stay-dry inner surface, odor control, soft cloth-like feel, and more. Below are the top five remedies that are ranked ordered with links to more information.

 

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What is the best option for male incontinence?

While many men prefer to use incontinence clamps to combat bladder leakage, absorbent solutions are also popular. By sales volume, the top absorbent remedies display below.

  • Prevail Male Guard Pads
  • Tena For Men Pads
  • Depend Guards
  • Briefmates
  • Sure Care Male Guards

 

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What are the top urinary pads?

Ranked ordered by the most searched solutions on the Internet, below is a list of the top five most popular pads.

  • Poise pads
  • Chux pads
  • Tena pads
  • Depends pads
  • Attends pads

 

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What are the top brands for incontinent supplies?

 

Top Absorbent Brands

 

Ranked ordered by the most searched brands on the Internet, this list displays the top ten bladder leak solutions.

  1. Attends
  2. TENA
  3. Prevail
  4. Depends
  5. Tranquility
  6. Kendall
  7. Medline
  8. FitRight
  9. Abena Abri
  10. Unique Wellness

 

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What are the absorbeny levels?

Basically, there are four absorbent levels. However, several manufacturers change the names of the absorbency levels or add additional levels to suit their own needs or in an attempt to differentiate their solutions. Some manufacturers are also adding a fifth level for overnight protection. This fifth level still falls under the fourth level or highest absorbent level. The four levels display below:

  • Light
  • Moderate
  • Heavy
  • Super or Maximum

 

Typical Absorbency Levels

Incontinence Product Absorption Levels

 

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Are there incontinence supplies for dogs or pets?

Yes, many consumers have adapted absorbent solutions to use with their pets. The most common adaptation is using underpads to protect flooring or carpets from pets while eating or pets with incontinence. The second most common adaptation is using briefs to catch pet urine and droppings. The tape and hook-and-loop fasteners make briefs very adaptable to the dogs and cats. The challenge for many pet owners is to train their pets not to remove the brief.

 

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What are the incontinence offerings for swimming?

Several manufacturers make disposable underwear for swimming, swim diapers, incontinence swimwear, or swimming pants. Worn beneath a bathing suit, incontinent swimwear is discreet in containing loose bowel. These garments offer a moisture-proof barrier that keeps urine and bowel leaks at bay. The swimming pool and the bathing suit remain clean. Its construction does not break apart when in contact with water. There are disposable and washable versions, both offering minimal swelling when exposed to water.

List of Swim Diapers

 

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What is the difference between Briefs and Reusable Underwear?

Most Disposable Briefs are one-time use only, with the exception of Salk and UroConcept alternatives. By definition, solutions in the Reusable Underwear category can be used multiple times.

 

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What are the advantages and disadvantages of reusable underwear?

Reusable Underwear can be cost effective over the long term. They also tend to be more form-fitting than disposable underwear and some find them more comfortable. But reusable underwear is not for everyone. Some people may have sanitation concerns, and may have difficulty handling soiled underwear.

 

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What should I look for in a brief or disposable pad?

Disposable Briefs and Disposable Pads are either pull-on or strap-on. Pull-on undergarments work like traditional underwear. They work well for people with a full range of motion. People with back problems, however, should consider strap-on or belted underwear instead. Strap-on underwear has some sort of fastener (varies between solutions) that secures the underwear. Although they are easier on the back, people with dexterity problems may have difficulty securing the strap.

 

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Are brand name absorbent supplies superior to generic?

A research study by the Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses (WOCN) Society regarding the slection and use of absorbent solutions for adults "found that brand name products tended to perform better than generic…."16

 

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What should I look for in a pad or shield?

Check to make sure that the pad can absorb the amount of urine typically leaked. When determining the amount urine leaked, keep in mind that there may be times in which the patient has to wear the underpad for longer than anticipated. Therefore, it is better to choose a larger capacity than a smaller one.

 

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Footnotes

 

 

 

 

 

Medical Studies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Burt Cancaster, Author

 

Vitality Medical
7910 South 3500 East, Suite C
Salt Lake City, UT 84121
(801) 733-4449
[email protected]

 

Burt Cancaster Profile

 

 

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